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here comes the flood

It's just been energy efficiency week, this year being publically championed by weather presenters. What's that you say, Michael Fish? If every household in the UK installed three energy saving light bulbs, electricity equivalent to the output of a typical power station would be saved each year?

The Environment Agency is going further; Welcome to Narnia… ahem! Sorry, Britain 2054! They mean Narnia at the beginning of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, under the brutal rule of the White Queen, though presumably without the talking animals.

Comments

( 10 worms — Feed the birds )
crunchcandy
1st Nov, 2004 10:20 (UTC)
I'd happily live in narnia...I guess I should shut my window really rather than turn the heat up...fresh air vs warmth?
purpletigron
2nd Nov, 2004 00:01 (UTC)
Good ventilation is the secret to both... open windows are slightly unsubtle :-)
cleanskies
2nd Nov, 2004 02:52 (UTC)
the heating in our offices
is attached to some sort of completely uncontrollable boiler deep in the bowels of the building which heats the fluid to near-boiling and pumps buckets of air into the system. It's a cycle -- you start with sauna levels of heat (open the windows or you may die), then things slowly cool down as the heaters fill up with air (we're at the top of the system) until eventually they're completely cold and I have to put the big jumper on or freeze.

On the bright side, we do have quite good ventilation -- through the holes in the plaster of the ceiling of the cupboards we can't use because of the fire regulations.
purpletigron
3rd Nov, 2004 08:42 (UTC)
Re: the heating in our offices
The civil engineers at Imperial College, London apparently designed a similar system for the new biochemistry building: the heating and cooling systems 'fight', and the college suffers power brown-outs. I believe the windows don't open, because that would disrupt the 'climate control'...

Who would believe that wind catcher technology is many hundreds of years old?
applez
1st Nov, 2004 10:31 (UTC)
Narnia eh?
Well, I suppose in that future we can call all rotten boys Edmund and have them pull our sleighs through the mud. ;-)

Living in Narnia - no thanks...ethnic minorities are inherently evil in Narnia.
cleanskies
2nd Nov, 2004 02:47 (UTC)
I'm always vaguely disappointed
that I don't have a friend called Edmund. I'd be able to call him a rotter, and give him a hard time about his moral turpitude.
uitlander
1st Nov, 2004 10:48 (UTC)
Shhhh! Don't remind them about the talking animals.
buddleia
2nd Nov, 2004 06:45 (UTC)
Whenever I get drunk and maudlin, I always start to get upset because then I believe London will be under water in fifty years. Once, a nice man stopped me in the street on the way home and asked me if I was ok and why was I crying. I couldn't say 'I'm drunk and miss my home city under the cold waves.' Because we were in SW9, so I just thanked him and carried on.
cleanskies
2nd Nov, 2004 08:32 (UTC)
mourning the future
I wonder if we're going to be doing more of that :(
buddleia
2nd Nov, 2004 08:38 (UTC)
Oh ah
Painful to think on. Hence whiskey. My old man said something like 'But...you can't really believe that! Most major cities are coastline cities! They'll all be in the same boat!' Me: 'Sod them! This where I grew up!' Then we turned to muppets as a conversational topic.
No booze for me tonight. *dons sanity goggles*
( 10 worms — Feed the birds )