?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Ada Lovelace day is quite exciting, isn't it? Props to all the lady scientists I know and the work you're doing. I've listened to you talk, over the years, about your place of work and how life is, being part of a minority; the exhausting pull of being cherished and despised, desired and resented. The exhaustion of being special, never being able to slip into a default, ordinary position. The small unfairnesses, the celebrated gains. The hope that it will be better in the future. From those who want children, I've heard, again and again, an exhausted collective frustration at the pressure not to breed. Often I've heard it termed as having to chose between children and a career, but I think that is inaccurate. It's not a choice; they need both children and a career. We all do, nowadays. Rather, I think it is a sort of back-door punishment. Science, classified as masculine, academic, non-family, non-sexual, must be populated by people who express within this behaviour set. Those who chose to express family or sexual behaviours are punished by having options decreased and interesting work taken away for those with "more time". It's subtle and insidious -- and doubtless hits some men, too.

Last of the tenovertwelvers. Now must dash


compiljansonia
compiljansonia
By dotty




new new new new sofa
new new new new sofa
My compilation

Comments

( 5 worms — Feed the birds )
pollitesss
25th Mar, 2010 09:44 (UTC)
You have said so much, in such a little space, about where we are. Particularly women scientists - but others too.

Add to this the subtle insidious cultural pressure on women to validate themselves by being sexual and eventually by becoming mothers and you have a recipe for frustration whether you want career and parenthood or just career.
cleanskies
25th Mar, 2010 19:18 (UTC)
Indeed, I've seen the women who don't breed penalised for that, too --sometimes from the very people who pressured them not to in the first place
zengineer
25th Mar, 2010 13:19 (UTC)
I was at the International Space Terahertz Technology conference this morning. Of around 200 delegates 3 were women.
cleanskies
25th Mar, 2010 19:03 (UTC)
BIG MACHINES
I feel for them. It's a tough job, being the first three in the room.
zengineer
26th Mar, 2010 09:08 (UTC)
Re: BIG MACHINES
The current funding crisis will also not be good for women. When money is tight scientists get cliquey and political which will exclude women and create an unpleasant environment that will make them want to leave.
( 5 worms — Feed the birds )