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cutting coupons and cobbling the hot bed

What a Sunday that was. I didn't cut the hedge, but everything else in the out-front garden was well achieved, including chatting with neighbours. Linda across the road is on a one-woman campaign to persuade me to breed. I explain about the crowd of nieblings. "You want one of your own, though," she says, "Just a little one."

Yesterday I realised that I had young, tender vine leaves in my back garden. I could make dolmades. Or maybe try wrapping something else in a vine leaf? Thus began the path to today's roast, Guineafowl stuffed with thyme and wrapped in vine leaves -- or as Damian would have it, Thymey-Viney Guineafowl. Carnivory under the cut.

Thymey-Viney Guineafowl

First wait for your thyme bush to come into flower. You'll need a lot of thyme.

Then obtain a smallish bird from your butcher. Mine said he had a quail, but it turned out to be a guineafowl. Undaunted, I bought it (and invited damiancugley to dinner to help dispose of the excess meat).

Cut enough thyme to fill the bird and enough vine leaves to wrap it. Blanche both to dispose of bugs and pests. Season and butter the bird, stuff with the thyme, wrap in vine leaves and then tightly in foil.

Blast it on high heat for fifteen minutes then drop it down to cool until it is done. Remove foil and vine leaves from the breast and set it back in the oven to brown (but keep the underside well wrapped). When it is brown, take it from the oven and wrap the foil over it again and let it sit for a while.

Serve with suitable accompaniments (we had chilli kale, honey-glazed carrots and onions and roast potatoes).

The meat was soft, fragrant and meltingly tender, while the vine leaves tasted almost bacony. I wonder what else I can wrap in vine leaves? Fish, maybe? Paneer? Oooh the possibilities.

Comments

( 8 worms — Feed the birds )
crazycrone
20th Jun, 2011 07:16 (UTC)
Some old biddy once warned me that women who didn't breed went insane when they hit menopause! (Didn't bother me, as I knew I was already nuts.) :-)
cleanskies
20th Jun, 2011 23:41 (UTC)
yeah, way too late to save my sanity...

(and today I had to explain using shears and shifting paving slabs to another neighbour -- I fear they feel I am insufficiently feminine...)
zengineer
20th Jun, 2011 11:21 (UTC)
They start out small but....
It's like getting a tiger kitten as a pet.
cleanskies
20th Jun, 2011 23:43 (UTC)
now that just makes it sound cute
smallbeasts
20th Jun, 2011 14:20 (UTC)
Just a little one
We prefer to call them compact children. They save money on beds, but cost about the same amount for food and clothing. Unfortunately I've no idea how we did it.
cleanskies
20th Jun, 2011 23:36 (UTC)
you don't get to choose the size
and small doesn't really run in the family
motodraconis
20th Jun, 2011 19:57 (UTC)
Sounds delish! I'm intrigued by the concept of vine-leaf paneer though, it's pretty versatile stuff.

Maybe the game for weekend and the paneer for everyday tasty.
cleanskies
20th Jun, 2011 23:38 (UTC)
me too, I don't want to overstress the vines but they taste so good
( 8 worms — Feed the birds )