Jeremy Dennis is Jeremy Day (cleanskies) wrote,
Jeremy Dennis is Jeremy Day
cleanskies

  • Mood:
  • Music:

gosh, my comics all sold; now thou art what thou art!

In London yesterday, mixing chores with pleasure, descended into Gosh (a London comics shop) to see whether any of my Whores of Mensa had sold. "I don't see them on the shelf," I said to the man behind the table, rudely interrupting a long and very earnest conversation about Captain Canuck. "That's because they all sold," he said, "With a name like that they would. No reflection on the quality of the contents, just for the name." The unspeaken rider being, which were a bit shit.

Or maybe it wasn't; maybe there was praise in that unspoken space (although I doubt it), but into silence I will always write the worst result. I think it's what artists do. He praised to the skies another small press comic I picked up; it did look pretty, but turned out to be the story of an ugly girl with glasses being bullied, beaten up and hospitalised by a pretty girl. Let that be a lesson to you.

I meant to ask about Lorna Miller comics, but after that didn't feel much like it (though I'm sure he meant nothing by it -- he jests at scars that never felt a wound). They'll take another ten (I used to sell about 30 there, back when my art was a lot more shit than it is now). It doesn't put me much in the mood for contacting other comics shops, though.

------------change of subject-----------

Damian just laughed at me. Something about a green-haired woman going tch at her livejournal in bed. I only asked him downstairs so he could see what kitten he was.

------------change of subject-----------

2004 seems to have been my year for deciding that Romeo and Juliet isn't as bad as all that after all. I hated it when I was a teenager; (whines) that's not proper tragedy, it's like a car crash, but I think the problem is that for various reasons it is often very clumsily cut.

Yesterday, the Globe was at full house, so we queued for returns for their (mixed sex, traditional dress) Romeo and Juliet (for anyone planning on going, apparently they usually have a lot). The season's in its third month, so the lines were slick and the production point-perfect as you might expect. And the clothes! Juliet was a vision in red damask and pearls, the mothers' dresses were luxuriantly grand, and as for the boys, well ... Tybalt and Benvolio, fighting over who is dandiest of them all; until Mercutio turns up, in embroidered cream, bravado and stubbornly spiky hair; but none of them able to hold a candle to Romeo, with his twisted lip, sombre looks, and extravagantly dagged pink and charcoal jerkin. That said, I think Juliet just had the edge in the Romeo-vs-Juliet prettiness contest. Just.

It's usually re-cut for kids, with the difficult, nasty and filthy bits politely excised. The Globe cuts no slack for the weak or romantic, however, and this production was busy with social issues, sword-fights, sex and dirty talk. Mostly from Mercutio. I couldn't quite believe he'd said what he said, so went to my routledge to check. And here it is (skipping over a lot of punning about pink, flowers and pumps):

Mercutio: [.....] was I with you there for the goose?
Romeo: Thou wast never with me for any thing when thou wast
not there for the goose.
M: I will bite thee by the ear for that jest.
R: Nay, good goose, bite not.
M: Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting; it is a most
sharp sauce.
R: And is it not well served in to a sweet goose?
M: O here's a wit of cheveril, that stretches from an
inch narrow to an ell broad!
R: I stretch it out for that word 'broad;' which added
to the goose, proves thee far and wide a broad goose.
M: Why, is not this better now than groaning for love?
now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo; now art
thou what thou art, by art as well as by nature:
for this drivelling love is like a great natural,
that runs lolling up and down to hide his bauble in a hole.
B: Stop there, stop there.

Mercutio, does not, however, stop there; and to truly enjoy the full depth of the tale that follows, buy a groundling ticket and lean against the stage about three-quarters of the way across on the right-hand side. You might get a nice surprise.

Of course, later you have to see him get killed in a stupid brawl over being called Romeo's "consort", but like I said, car crash ....

The almost complete text (it skips the chorus and a little bit of painful clowning) also rendered up a mention of Mercutio's brother Valentine (the "Valentine" from Two Gentlemen of Verona?) who may yet go on to star in a comic strip.

I like the idea of Mercutio having a sensible younger brother.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 6 comments