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happy friday and all that

I have a row of black tulips in my front garden. I'm confused because I planted alternate blue and black tulips, and last year that is how they came up. This year they've all reverted to black, except one that's sort of blackcurant and vanilla striped. I wonder what mechanism causes that? Found on the internet, the saying, "as goth as a row of black tulips". I wonder if you could do that for other flowers?

While we're on flowers, let me include a special electro bonus! Go to the website of electro queer boy Delphinium Blue, give him your email address, and you'll get taken to a page containing 12 free mp3s. Then (not that I'm denigrating the bizarre vampiric delights of "thickly buttered coffin" or anything) go to the fourth download, "I'll come find you". Happy Friday!


oh my duckie!
oh my duckie!
He's just done something in a fancy college water feature that made the receptionist twitchy.

Comments

( 5 worms — Feed the birds )
badasstronaut
9th May, 2008 11:56 (UTC)
mysterious tulips
Last year I had yellow ones and red ones. This year all yellow.
cleanskies
9th May, 2008 12:59 (UTC)
tulips of mystery!
And I haven't planted *any* large red tulips at all, and yet I have three. They do seem to grow in my area like weeds, though (in unkempt front gardens, e.g.)

According to the interwebs, changing from red to yellow is pretty normal for tulips because they "don't return reliably".
zengineer
9th May, 2008 12:46 (UTC)
The vanilla stripe is caused by a fairly common tulip virus. I'm not sure about the blue/black thing.
cleanskies
9th May, 2008 13:06 (UTC)
Oooh yes, that virus people thought could be reproduced by breeding... well, that's nothing to panic about. I like stripy tulips!
juggzy
9th May, 2008 13:10 (UTC)
Stripiness in tulips is as the result of a virus air, although JG might have more info.
( 5 worms — Feed the birds )